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Installation view, Women's Work, Greene Naftali, New York, 1996

Installation view, Women's Work
Greene Naftali, New York, 1996
 

Installation view, Women's Work, Greene Naftali, New York, 1996

Installation view, Women's Work
Greene Naftali, New York, 1996

Installation view, Women's Work, Greene Naftali, New York, 1996

Installation view, Women's Work
Greene Naftali, New York, 1996

Installation view, Women's Work, Greene Naftali, New York, 1996

Installation view, Women's Work
Greene Naftali, New York, 1996

Sherrie Levine Fountain, 1989, cast bronze, 15 x 25 x 14 1/2 inches

Sherrie Levine
Fountain, 1989
cast bronze
15 x 25 x 14 1/2 inches
 

Jacqueline Humphries, Untitled, 1996, oil on canvas, 72 x 72 inches

Jacqueline Humphries
Untitled, 1996
oil on canvas
72 x 72 inches
 

Lynda Benglis Contraband, 1969, poured pigmented latex, 33.9 x 9.1 inches

Lynda Benglis
Contraband, 1969
poured pigmented latex
33.9 x 9.1 inches
 

Lynda Benglis, Pope Waverly, 1986, wire mesh, bronze, chrome, 53 x 38 x 11 inches

Lynda Benglis
Pope Waverly, 1986
wire mesh, bronze, chrome
53 x 38 x 11 inches

Jeanne Silverthorne, Untitled, 1995, rubber, resin and wood dimensions variable

Jeanne Silverthorne
Untitled, 1995
rubber, resin and wood
dimensions variable
 

Joan Mitchell, Untitled, 1958, oil on canvas, 77 3/4 x 68 inches

Joan Mitchell
Untitled, 1958
oil on canvas
77 3/4 x 68 inches
 

Joan Mitchell, Untitled, 1985, oil on canvas, 77 3/4 x 68 inches

Joan Mitchell
Untitled, 1985
oil on canvas
77 3/4 x 68 inches
 

Louise Fishman, Blonde Ambition, 1995, oil on linen, 90 x 65 inches

Louise Fishman
Blonde Ambition, 1995
oil on linen
90 x 65 inches
 

Nancy Spero, Gunship, 1967, gouache on paper, 27 1/2 x 39 1/2 inches

Nancy Spero
Gunship, 1967
gouache on paper
27 1/2 x 39 1/2 inches
 

Martha Rosler, Woman with Cannon (Dots), 1969-72, photomontage printed as color photograph, 20 x 24 inches, ed. 1/10

Martha Rosler
Woman with Cannon (Dots), 1969-72
photomontage printed as color photograph
20 x 24 inches, ed. 1/10
 

Martha Rosler, Cleaning the Drapes, 1969-72, photomontage printed as color photograph, 20 x 24 inches, ed. 2/10

Martha Rosler
Cleaning the Drapes, 1969-72
photomontage printed as color photograph
20 x 24 inches, ed. 2/10
 

Louise Bourgeois, Nature Study, 1984, cast bronze, 30 x 19 x 15 inches

Louise Bourgeois
Nature Study, 1984
cast bronze
30 x 19 x 15 inches
 

Louise Bourgeois, Spider II, 1995, bronze, 23 x 65 x 52 inches, ed. 2/6

Louise Bourgeois
Spider II, 1995
bronze
23 x 65 x 52 inches, ed. 2/6
 

Kiki Smith, Second Choice, 1987, ceramic, 19 1/2 x 13 x 7 inches

Kiki Smith
Second Choice, 1987
ceramic
19 1/2 x 13 x 7 inches
 

Lee Bontecou, Untitled, 1965, iron, 21 x 60 x 3 inches

Lee Bontecou
Untitled, 1965
iron
21 x 60 x 3 inches
 

Lee Krasner, Messenger, 1959, oil on canvas, 69 x 69 inches

Lee Krasner
Messenger, 1959
oil on canvas
69 x 69 inches
 

Suzanne McClelland, wait, 1991, acrylic, clay, charcoal, gesso on canvas, 72 x 72 inches

Suzanne McClelland
wait, 1991
acrylic, clay, charcoal, gesso on canvas
72 x 72 inches
 

Press Release

The Greene Naftali Gallery will present an exhibition entitled Women’s Work opening September 6th and continuing through October 13th. The exhibition is curated by John Sacchi and will include historical and contemporary work by Lynda Benglis, Dara Birnbaum, Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, Louise Fishman, Nan Goldin, Jacqueline Humphries, Lee Krasner, Barbara Kruger, Sherrie Levine, Suzanne McClelland, Joan Mitchell, Cady Noland, Martha Rosler, Cindy Sherman, Jeanne Silverthorne, Kiki Smith and Nancy Spero.

This exhibition attempts to show the forceful presence of women artists working in a wide range of artistic practices from the fifties to the present. The curator has made the following statement for the exhibition:

 

     Not long ago, MoMA asked Elizabeth Murray to organize an exhibition of women artists; although many fine artists were represented, for the most part the works were small scale. While the “heroic” evolves as much from the power of ideas as it does from scale, the MoMA show had an overall “Women’s Exchange” tone that did not confront the traditional association of heroism with the male artist. The current selections are intended to foster that confrontation, in both content and scale.

     Hans Hoffman once infamously said; “This painting is so good it could have been done by a man.” A dealer one told Joan Mitchell; “Joan, if only you were male, French and dead.” Gender prejudice still very much exists in the artworld. Within that area, women are often associated with contemplative art, while painting and particularly expressionism is thought of as a more aggressive form traditionally associated with maleness and Modernism.

     The choices here are undeniably a reflection of my own taste. They are not necessarily about germinal ideas, feminist concerns, radical moments or “firsts”. Rather I have chosen artists in full swing, and points in time directly relevant to the dismantling of gender-based power.

                                                                                                                                                John Sacchi

                                                                                                                                                New York, 1996